Bicycles , More Bicycles And All Things Bicycles

Discussion in 'Knives, Gear, Guns And Other Tools' started by RocketmanDane, Sep 17, 2016.

?

Do you own a Bicycle? If Yes what kind? Select all that apply.

  1. Yes

    67.4%
  2. No

    5.3%
  3. Mountain

    80.0%
  4. Racing

    24.2%
  5. Recumbent

    1.1%
  6. Cruiser

    14.7%
  7. Unicycle

    3.2%
  8. Other

    28.4%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. NoRest

    NoRest Member

    Messages:
    285
    Likes Received:
    676
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    The Beef State
    Just ordered the Shimano XT's. All the components on my bike are XT or XTR. Im sure I'll be happy with them.
     
  2. GaryMc

    GaryMc Member

    Messages:
    1,530
    Likes Received:
    1,871
    Location:
    A better place
    Here's my other restomod bicycle, 1956 Girardengo (Italian) Twin Bar. Super rare bike. Was originally a Sturmey Archer 3-speed internal hub, last owner swapped it to a 3-speed derailleur. Only thing left I plan to do is swap it back to an internal hub but this time a Shimano Nexus 8 to make riding for this old man a little easier & enjoyable.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Wolfman Zack and dhunley1 like this.
  3. dhunley1

    dhunley1 Member

    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    1,068
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Michigan
    Holy smokes! @GaryMc

    Those are some beautiful bikes. What an amazing collection.
     
    GaryMc likes this.
  4. dhunley1

    dhunley1 Member

    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    1,068
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Michigan
    Yeah, it's great down there. My aunt, a couple of my uncles and a whole bunch of cousins live in Wilmington.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2016
  5. GaryMc

    GaryMc Member

    Messages:
    1,530
    Likes Received:
    1,871
    Location:
    A better place
    Thanks @dhunley1 !!!!!
     
  6. Baldcutnut

    Baldcutnut Member

    Messages:
    465
    Likes Received:
    365
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Georgia
    Very nice GaryMc, love to see things restored like this.
     
    GaryMc likes this.
  7. GaryMc

    GaryMc Member

    Messages:
    1,530
    Likes Received:
    1,871
    Location:
    A better place
    Thanks @Baldcutnut !!!! These have kind of all been labors of love to build, never get my money out of them but worth it for the enjoyment value of getting my hands dirty, building them, and then riding them.
     
  8. GaryMc

    GaryMc Member

    Messages:
    1,530
    Likes Received:
    1,871
    Location:
    A better place
    Here's the two on tap to be restored after I retire, already have all the parts and a lot of rare accessories as well, just need the time to finish them.

    1915 Sears Chief - This was the very first bicycle with a 3-speed internal coaster brake hub made by Sturmey Archer. These were made from 1915-1921 but this one is a 1915, very very rare bicycle. There maybe around a dozen still in existence from all years made. Ashamed someone painted it with an orange paint that is extremely durable. Started removing it slowly before I put it away a few years back and know I probably will need a month to see if I can remove it and maintain the original paint under there. My preference is always to preserve original paint & finishes where possible.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Head Badge made of brass & glass cloisonné.

    [​IMG]

    Early pic of a Sears Chief

    [​IMG]

    1927 Stutz Motorbike, another super rare bike, the only one I've ever seen.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Head Badge

    [​IMG][/URL
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2016
    Stone likes this.
  9. Yardman

    Yardman Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    181
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Erie Pa
    Any one have any experience with jamis renegade exploit steel gravel bike. About to sell my Massi cyclocross and get one.
     
  10. AddictedToSteel

    AddictedToSteel Member

    Messages:
    894
    Likes Received:
    841
    Location:
    Michigan
    I don't have a bike, but if I did I think I really like this one. I would have some accessories for it, but as a starting point this is a good one.
     
    Stone likes this.
  11. Stone

    Stone Member

    Messages:
    3,942
    Likes Received:
    4,161
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Way Far NE US
    Here's one article of several that sold me on it.

    You'll find more about it -- and bikepacking -- here.

    I'm a backpacker, but as I get older and develop an aversion to carrying heavy loads on my back, I want to explore bikepacking and canoe packing -- LOTs of backroads and lakes (hundreds of square miles, including Moosehead Lake (largest in the state) and Allagash Wilderness Waterway) up here.

    This map is mostly my new county -- second largest in Maine -- where I'll live starting next week. It's one of 7 pioneer counties in the US, only two of which are in the east. My new town is at the bottom of the map. There's not much north of there but deer and racoons; very low human population. That big "blank area" where it looks like there are no highways is largely roadless -- at least highway-less, and most roads are dirt. It's the biggest, baddest, wildest country this side of the Miss'sippi River. Mt Katahdin is near the middle, where the US Appalachian Trail ends. The last 100 miles of the AT is called the Hundred Mile Wilderness, some of the most rugged trail I've ever seen as an experienced backpacker (especially in the Rockies), and one of the two most rugged sections (the other is in Georgia). There are plans to extend the AT into Canada as the International AT, running up into Labrador. That's Quebec on the left; New Brunswick and Nova Scotia are to the east.

    PIscataquis County -- Earth view.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2016
  12. Baldcutnut

    Baldcutnut Member

    Messages:
    465
    Likes Received:
    365
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Georgia

    Looking forward to the finish product, keep us updated on progress.
     
  13. ManOfSteel

    ManOfSteel Member

    Messages:
    4,388
    Likes Received:
    9,904
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    NJ
    @Stone I'm dying to start bikepacking but @JV3 wont break his bike out with me. I love the 27.5+ tires. The mid-fat profile gives me the PERFECT balance for the type of rider I am.. allows me to go anywhere on any terrain but also plenty fast. All the shops here seem to think that the plus tires are going to take over.
     
    Stone likes this.
  14. Stone

    Stone Member

    Messages:
    3,942
    Likes Received:
    4,161
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Way Far NE US
    I hear you about those 27.5"ers. For a guy your age that likes some off road, I suspect they're perfect. For me, 29" gets the call. I don't do and wont' do much off-road. Backroads, logging roads are my game. And the 29'ers roll over logs, rocks and curbs like they're not even there.
     
    Ibisman56 likes this.
  15. ManOfSteel

    ManOfSteel Member

    Messages:
    4,388
    Likes Received:
    9,904
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    NJ
    Low and slow. (Low air pressure that is). If I hit the lotto I'd have a decked out carbon Specialized Fatboy and the carbon version of my bike for sure. I want a fat bike for winter cruising but can't pull another $3000+ bike purchase.

    Edit to add: the fatbikes can actually be real fast with the right rider on top of them. They climb hills like crazy also.
     
    Ibisman56 and Stone like this.
  16. Stone

    Stone Member

    Messages:
    3,942
    Likes Received:
    4,161
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Way Far NE US
    You should talk to @Wolfman Zack about that. He has experience with that bike.
     
    ManOfSteel likes this.
  17. Wolfman Zack

    Wolfman Zack Member

    Messages:
    667
    Likes Received:
    654
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    Standard alloy frame Fatboy with carbon fork, 1x10 gearing, and 4.5" tires at 10psi.
    That is my setup, and I love it.

    No kidding about how these things climb, it's faster than my 29'er uphill.
    Also the soft tires act as shock absorbers, taking all the vibration out of riding rough trails.
     
    ManOfSteel likes this.
  18. AddictedToSteel

    AddictedToSteel Member

    Messages:
    894
    Likes Received:
    841
    Location:
    Michigan
    While I have done some backpacking I prefer using a canoe. Carries a lot of gear and you can use the wind to help you move along if you want to take a break. I have spent many nights camping next to a moving body of water and it is definitely my preferred method of camping.
     
    ManOfSteel likes this.
  19. Stone

    Stone Member

    Messages:
    3,942
    Likes Received:
    4,161
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Way Far NE US
    Ah, so we're expanding this thread to include canoes.
    I guess I started it upstream, and here we are.

    This is the boat I want next <-- name hint>.
    Hybrid canoe kayak by Old Town;
    made and sold just east of where I'll be.

    Carries gear like a canoe -- open on top, 450 lb capacity.
    But a narrow beam like a kayak, sitting low, moved by a double blade paddle.

    Almost like an A-10 for the water.

    Zoom zoom.

    [​IMG]
     
    AddictedToSteel likes this.
  20. AddictedToSteel

    AddictedToSteel Member

    Messages:
    894
    Likes Received:
    841
    Location:
    Michigan
    I wasn't trying to deviate from bikes, but some of the things about using a canoe are the same things that draw me towards bike camping, namely the ability to move more gear with less effort and more speed. The Viet Cong used bicycles to move hundreds of pounds of supplies on little more than game trails.

    I find it a little amusing, if not dumb, that in EMP novels like 77 Days in September the "hero" of the story seems to choose walking as his method of travel to get from here to there, there being hundreds or even more than a thousand miles from point A. Bikes make so much sense for faster and quieter travel. But that discussion is for a different thread.
     
    Stone likes this.

Share This Page