Machetes, Kukris & Hybrids

Discussion in 'Knives, Gear, Guns And Other Tools' started by Stone, Sep 20, 2018.

  1. Stone

    Stone Member

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    That's what this thread is about.

    Here's some context. As a teen -- about 50 years ago -- I bought a machete. It worked where I lived then, just outside of Memphis (TN). Weeds, creeks, swamps, that sort of thing.

    Then, I found axes, moved west to the Rockies, and forgot machetes.

    Roll tape forward 50 years or so, and -- by (now a bad memory) circumstance --
    I moved to northern Maine, just two hours from Quebec.

    Up here, swamp/marsh is about 5% of the state. (Think permanently swollen rivers.)
    December - early March: snow cover. 3 - 4'.

    Yet, I need a tool to cut trail, cut firewood (small, since I carry a 5 oz backpacking stove),
    and for ... well, SD, in addition to my spear -- another story.

    So, last week, after much deliberation, I decided to switch my focus from axe/hatchet to
    kukri (actually hybrids between them and machetes).

    I bought my first made of soft mystery steel -- 20" -- and will buy a second with a
    larger blade angle made by an unpopular but successful blade maker w/in a week.

    I've now started studying these blades, looking into topics like
    • "how to avoid cutting your leg off with a machete"
    • "how to cut down a large tree with a kukri",
    • "how to fillet a trout with a hybrid".
    Others here have far more knowledge of these blades than me.

    I'm here to learn.

    Oh, btw, if someone in ESEE produces a hybrid, I'll buy one.
     
  2. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    YES! an Esee kukri the thickness of the 5,and one the thickness of the Junglas. Both with 18 - 20" blades and micarta scales. Full tang.
     
  3. Stone

    Stone Member

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    ^ I'm seeing both of those.

    Seems to me that @Expat and his line is well suited for this niche.
     
  4. junglebum

    junglebum Member

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    To be honest I think the kukri is a design more suited to its original purpose as a weapon not a woods tool personally if its a big blade in that vane I prefer a traditional style machete or more of a bolo or even a parang although the last isn’t my first choice. I have a fair amount of experience with large blades like that but am by no means an expert. I feel a simple design with a straight spine and very little recurve gives you more useful portions of the blade and are significantly easier to sharpen in the field.
     
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  5. HelRaiser

    HelRaiser Member

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    I don't understand why there aren't more functional Kukris out there with modern materials. You have vaguely Kukri shaped machetes, decorative wall hangers, and then finally the solid ones upwards of $500.

    But "IT'S NOT TRADITIONAL" Man, people can do Micarta handled Bowies in Kydex all day long, but put a curve in a blade and folks start to get notions.
     
  6. STPNWLF

    STPNWLF Member

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  7. BlueDogScout

    BlueDogScout Member

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    I had a kabar kukuri that wasn’t half bad.
     
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  8. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

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    Man oh man did you ever open a can of worms with this thread amigo. ;). I'm not personally familiar with the Maine forest (thickets?) but I do know a few people there and from what I've seen a machete would serve well. You get a choice between 14" -18", A Tram 14" would be a good compromise between knife ( filleting fish) and machete (cutting sticks to cook him on), an 18" will do it too just takes a bit more practice and care in the doing. Those are economical too.

    You could also go in for a 14" bolo style ( Condor brand) . It's a high quality item, good steel, decent sheath. Stil short enough to be compact. Some really like the wide tip/ weight forward effect but I have not tried one myself.

    In Kukri's ( or Kukri shaped objects if you want) it's harder to find a compromise between a $20 CS Kukri machete and a Bill Siegle custom. For my purposes the CS Kukri machete works just fine, very economical, full tang, durable handle, there are even upgrade Kydex sheaths to be had on Amazon,ect. Mine will shave hair, took me a bit to shape the edge to that but for a couple of dollars you could Ben to set the profiles for you. ;)
    It's a tool you have to work with but play with it enough and processing a fish, or some veggies for an omlet, will be easy peasy.

    Now the last question is do you really....really really, want me to clutter up your thread with pictures? Because I got pictures, lots n lots of em! :D
     
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  9. Stone

    Stone Member

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  10. Stone

    Stone Member

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    Off to a good start here. Already, some issues have been raised that I was hoping to learn more about.

    I have a busy work day, but will return after work with more about ... what I think I'm looking for, or at least want to experiment with.
     
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  11. STPNWLF

    STPNWLF Member

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  12. STPNWLF

    STPNWLF Member

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    Baryonxy machete
    IMG_20180921_134237.jpg
     
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  13. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

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    image.jpeg

    This is about a 6"-7" green hardwood, I couldn't give you a real estimate of time or number of hits to do. Still not bad for a 17 ounce 13" machete.
     
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  14. Stone

    Stone Member

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    I have indeed. And I was going to invite him to this thread later, so thanks for paging him.

    In fact, I was privileged to watch him develop it from a distance. (We've lived within a few hours of each other in Maine for years, but never got our acts together to actually get together. He's busy as hell with work, and I'm motorized-vehicle-challenged.) He shared some of the original drawings of it with me and some others seeking some feedback.

    I think it's a fantastic machete at a fine price -- of course, his entire lineup of blades is like that: great quality at great prices. (I really like his business philosophy.) And of course, he designed his machete specifically for conditions here, especially for landowners. It's hard to describe how ecologically different and diverse Maine's ecosystems are; they really require some different tools, and this one fills that niche.

    Having said that, it's not right for me and my uses. I'm looking for a packing machete/kukri (I call the hybrids "makuks") that's smaller and lighter. The Baryonyx is a beast well suited for more landed folks that don't need to be so concerned with inches and ounces.

    Plus, as I'll try to describe later -- I'm on a break now from work -- I really want to explore the dynamics of a makuk, not a full bend kukri (which didn't work well for me), but more than a machete. Tonight, I'll describe the one I have now (for less than a week) with some pics of it along side some other tools. Then, I'll describe the next one I'm going to try out after payday (or once I get paid for an ebay sale, which ever comes first).
     
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  15. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

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    image.jpeg image.jpeg

    Here is a try stick, done with my 18". Part of the reason I have mostly gone over to the more Latin/straight edge types is the ability to choke up and actually use them in a more knife like manner. I have done up quite a bit of food prep with this monster, much to the amusement of friends and fellow pirates. :)
     
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  16. Stone

    Stone Member

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    Is this a Cold Steel Kukri Machete? If so, what's up with the two inches or so of the blade right by the handle? Looks like it's not developed as a cutting edge there. :confused:

     
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  17. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Moderator Staff Member

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    The base of the blade isn't sharpened. They normally aren't on a lot of machetes, and many folks like to use that region for choking up on the blade.
     
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  18. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

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    42 is correct, the long (er) un sharpened section is common on machetes. On some of the really long 24" it can be a full hands width.
     
  19. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

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    Mine are quite sharp. :D. Notice the choked up grip.....
     
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  20. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

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    If you consider that a machete is a hacking tool, you want it to chop your way thru alder thickets or blackberry patches, or chop up some sticks for your twig stove,you just want a decent utility edge. One of the pull thru sharpeners by Smiths or Lansky will do just fine. The trio shown up top here is...around 24 oz or 1.5 lbs approximately. Even on your belt it's almost unnoticed, and alway there if you wander off a ways from where your pack is. ;)
     
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