Winter 4x4ing - good things to have in the rig

Discussion in 'Overlanding / Off-Road' started by Bushman5, Jan 2, 2017.

  1. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    - ski patrol style avalanche snow shovel for rapid snow removal
    - 25 lb bag of sand for traction on ice
    - 10 LB bag of Instalite BBQ briquettes - gets extremely hot and lasts about 2 - 3 hours, can be used to get wet wood going.
    - can of bbq starter fluid or diesel mixed with naptha or gas.
    - small pair of bear paw snowshoes if you ever have to walk out.

    lets get some more ideas here...
     
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  2. Mountainmistwanderer

    Mountainmistwanderer Member

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    Emergency Bivy or wool blankets
     
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  3. Andy the Aussie

    Andy the Aussie Moderator of the Century Staff Member

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    In another thread we have already establish that both dead hookers and sheep are useful additions.... ;)

    I am from Australia....what the heck would I know about travelling in snow...LOL In fairness...yes we get pleanty of snow here, some just to the west of Sydney and certainly back where I grew up...nothing at all like you do in Nth America however... !

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    - bottles of water, lots.
    - beeswax tea candles / matches / lighters
    - sleeping bags
    - easy to eat high calorie foods, Snickers bars , cans of tuna in oil etc.
     
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  5. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    FAK with Tourniquet.
     
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  6. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

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    CS Spetnaz shovel, come-a-long, 2 12ft snatch straps,10ft tow chain, woodsman pal (machete like chopper), good sized chunk of fatwood,hi-lift jack, set of coveralls......
     
  7. Ravenous12

    Ravenous12 Member

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  8. james gormley

    james gormley Member

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    Bottle of knob creek, for when you have to wait to be rescued.
     
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  9. Strigidae

    Strigidae Moderator Staff Member

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    Auto parts common to breakage and tools
    Extra fuel
    ESEE 4
    Extra clothing
    Rope
     
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  10. Benson X

    Benson X Member

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    Very good ideas and items listed here. Here are some other things I keep in the truck, usually all the time.
    • Tire Chains. The RUD 4x4 Grip are a decent chain that can fit up to 33" tires.
    • Quality Tire Gauge and 12v Air Compressor (if you air down. I typically air down to 12-15 psi, depending on how deep and dense the snow is)
    • Recovery Boards (MaxTrax or TREDs)
    • The Jack-Mate Hi-Lift accessory is invaluable in a variety of situations, so it always stays in the rig with my Hi-Lift.
    • Rescue Tape
    • Basic Tools essential to vehicle repair.
    • Recovery Hitch Vise. I got the Matco Trail D-Vise, and I love it! Wilton also make a very good one.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
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  11. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

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    Fleece blankets or bags, SOL bivy bag, rescue tac axe (mine is a condor all steel version,a guy on bcusa mentioned a RMJ shrike, and I believe Bushman has the boker tac axe, take your pick.) A few lifeboat rations or shelf stable type food at not a bad idea either+I carry a couple of gallons of potable water.

    Edit thought: It seems in re-reading the replies a lot of us are on the same page ;) but there's always something to learn. I found a 13" trailer wheel to use as a "foot" for my hi-lift jack, doesn't weigh a lot and sure keeps that sucker above the soup/mud we get down south.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2017
  12. JAD

    JAD Member

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    Watchman's cap, wool cap, or some type of headwear for retaining warmth from your head.

    Flashlight and batteries.

    Edited -- modifier removed. Suggestion to have a hat remains.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2017
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  13. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    - MRE heaters, MULTI usage.....heat water , heat body (carefully) , heat food.
     
  14. AddictedToSteel

    AddictedToSteel Member

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    This interests me.

    I have heard for years that you air down for sand, but that you keep full pressure for snow. You want to ride over sand and not sink down. Snow, on the other hand, you want to pack down, so you have a narrower tire than for sand, fully inflated so it will pack the snow down giving you better traction.

    I am not disputing your recommendation, but it is different than what I learned and I am wondering what you might know that I don't.
     
  15. JAD

    JAD Member

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    I would not air down a highway tire that the vast majority of vehicles are running on. Drive those tires at the pressures they're designed for. If you have A/T's (All Terrains) I probably still wouldn't air down. If you are running full on M/T Mud Terrains then I would air down. M/T's are generally found in the larger tire sizes which offers greater air volume, a larger footprint, and obviously much deeper lug patterns. If aired down to around 12-15 psi it would create an excellent footprint in the snow.
     
  16. Benson X

    Benson X Member

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    It's basically the same concept as airing down in sand; increase your flotation and tread footprint. Most guys with 37"+ tires will air down to 8-10 psi in the snow, but I rarely go down to single digits. With the lower psi, you are increasing the weight displacement per tire, which will in turn create a wider stance and less surface area pressure on the powder/snow. It all depends on the snow "texture" and depth as well; you may not need/want to air down in hard-pack, old icy snow, but definitely in deeper fresh powder.

    @JAD makes a good point about the tires though. I run 10-ply M/Ts with a 3-ply sidewall - so they'll hold up to the increased wear/flex on the carcass and sidewall. I don't recommend airing down street tires, A/Ts, or 2-ply sidewall tires (Duratracs) lower than 20 psi. And never air down if you are running chains - keep them at highway pressure.
     
  17. .357 mag

    .357 mag Member

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    I call Jake from State Farm.
     
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  18. Boker55

    Boker55 Member

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  19. koolaidnd

    koolaidnd Member

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    -stove and a couple fuel canisters. I have a Coleman canister stove and a couple canisters of MSR fuel. I like stoves for immediate heat and cooking. If my family needs something hot, I'd rather stoke the stove then go get firewood for a fire.
    -
     
  20. evilunclegrimace

    evilunclegrimace Member

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    You lose the same percentage of heat from your head as you do any other body part that is exposed to the elements. The loss from your head is about 10%..
     

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