Zip-Stitch

Discussion in 'Wilderness and Tactical Healthcare Management' started by Benson X, Nov 25, 2018.

  1. Benson X

    Benson X Member

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    I had never seen these before. Spendy as hell, and probably won't ever end up in my kits - but I think they are a VERY cool design and great concept. They're like zip-ties for a laceration! :eek:


    Anyone ever use a Zip-Stitch, or seen/had one used at a hospital? They claim they've been used in over 500,000 hospital procedures, but this is the first I've seen or heard of them.

    I might contact to the company to see if they can donate a few to our SAR unit.
     
  2. Hammer

    Hammer Member

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    Interesting. Looks like basically a more straightforward way to apply Steri Strips. If you end up getting your hands on some I'd be interested to hear your feedback.
     
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  3. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    Here’s my question.. I want to know where theses so called 500,000 procedures have occurred and I on what??
    I have been around the surgery dept for a number of years and never heard of such a product. I even get a monthly surgery magazine and have never seen it mentioned... Might be a great product but I would have some serious questions before I would buy one... Surgeons still goes will glue and butterfly bandaids or steristrips ... Don’t try to fix what is not broken IMO...
     
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  4. Benson X

    Benson X Member

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    I sent them an email. I've used steri-strips and super glue / new skin many times, but I've never had to self-suture any wounds. These seem like an easy, fool-proof way to seal up a wound (esp. if you're doing it one handed).

    I can think of at least a half-dozen instances where I would've used one of these if they were available.

    I thought the same thing - and am a bit skeptical of their claims. It seems like a fairly new product (2018) and many of their references and citations are from 2017.

    More info. from their website has some more data, refs, and citations to research:
    https://zipstitch.us/pages/hospital-grade-technology

    "ZipLine Medical is a Silicon Valley-based company founded by a physician to address the clinical need for rapid, non-invasive and easy-to-use skin closure. The company has partnered with hospitals in 30 countries over the past five years to treat over a half a million patients."
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Hammer

    Hammer Member

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    Yeah, that's a good point I hadn't considered. I can remember several times when I was trying to apply Steris strips to myself one-handed and it didn't so well.
     
  6. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    I like the idea esp in a emergency. It is just a little weird IMO that they focus a little to much on the cosmetic benefits. Those same results can be accomplished by almost any surgeon with the right suture and a little extra care.
     
  7. BlueDogScout

    BlueDogScout Member

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    I have seen videos on these awhile back. I think there was even a post about them a few months back. I was interested until I saw the price tag.
     
  8. IW17

    IW17 Member

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    How well would these work if you didn't have clean shaven legs like the fella in the video?
     
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  9. Benson X

    Benson X Member

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    I have no clue. I assume the adhesive is pretty hardcore and would rip out any hair on the affected area, which in itself may pose a risk to opening the wound again while removing the strip.

    I'm a f*cking hairy ape, so I'm curious if they recommend shaving the are prior to applying, or just deal with it.
     
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  10. Strigidae

    Strigidae Moderator Staff Member

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    If you are that hairy just braid the hair across the wound and call it done.
     
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  11. Benson X

    Benson X Member

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    YES!!! Now that is thinking outside the box! :)
     
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  12. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    I dunno about this stuff.

    Whats wrong with applying a dressing/izzy/quickclot, then a bandage wrap/tensor for pressure, etc on scene, then let the surgeons do their wicked sewing skills at the ER/Hosp? In all the open gaping wounds (including chainsaw gouges the size of old mary jane rotten crotch, I have field treated....a basic bandage dressing/izzy/quickclot followed by a tensor, or guaze or 6" wide nitrile rubber exercise bands wraps have done just fine.......and for pennies on the $

    let the cosmetic BS be dealt with AT THE ER/Hosp/OR .

    this seems like a glorified way of treating a major gash/slice/gouge/chainsaw channel etc......

    now i want to see a field usable laser unit the size of a pen that can laser seal gashes etc in 10 seconds<<<that i would be excited by.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2018
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  13. Hammer

    Hammer Member

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    I tend to agree - if you close up a laceration that is likely going to need stitches (or other wound closure) and then head promptly to the ER, they're probably just going to open it up again, so they can clean it and close it up professionally.

    Like Steri Strips, I think it would be most useful in the backcountry where it may be a while before you can get to an ER, and wound closure may already start taking place organically (or it starts healing open), given the time delay in evac'ing. I've also had some lacerations in the backcountry that weren't really serious enough to call for a trip all the way from a remote location to a frontcountry hospital for proper stitches, but for which that sort of wound closure was still helpful and promoted better healing.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2018
  14. Benson X

    Benson X Member

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    The cosmetic benefits are irrelevant to me - but the simplicity and ease-of-use of this design are very intriguing.

    There's nothing wrong with treating a wound using different methods. There are numerous field alternatives and almost all of which would be more cost-effective than this thing - EXCEPT for paying for a hospital visit (at least here in the US).

    While those less-expensive options are great in the field, those steri-strips, gauze, antiseptic, sutures, nitrile gloves etc. will carry about a 1000% markup if you visit a hospital. Even if you don't pay (all) those costs out of pocket, it's still perpetuating the horrible privatized insurance/medical system we have here in the states (but that's a whole other thread that would get locked). I don't like going to the ER/hospital unless it's absolutely necessary.

    If I could have the option to sterilize and field dress a wound in seconds and have the dressing perform as good, if not better than sutures, I'm all for it. Especially if you can do it one-handed or solo.

    I know this seems "gimmicky", but I don't want to knock it till I try it. I really just want to get my hands on one (or two) and hope I never have to use them. Or, if I do, at least I will have some real-world feedback about how they work. :)
     

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