The Sharpening Thread

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Kevo, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    That's awesome!
     
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  2. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    So I've tried touching up my benchmade 940 freehand a couple times now, and I seem to keep missing the tip to about 3/4" back on the blade. I'm going to try to give it the full brick and do-over treatment this weekend. If the third time isn't the charm I'm sending this damn thing to benchmade for a sharpening.
     
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  3. Strigidae

    Strigidae Moderator Staff Member

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    Thats odd...
     
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  4. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    I think it's uneven grinds from the factory, combined with my mediocre skillset lol.
     
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  5. Drew RedBear

    Drew RedBear Member

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    When stropping, black is a finer grit than green correct? Meaning I'll get a better polish with black
     
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  6. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Moderator Staff Member

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    Black is typically considered one of the coarser compounds. But how fine vs. coarse a buffing compound will be will vary from maker to maker on account of the particular mix of grit sizes they use. Polishing compounds typically do not use sorted/graded grit, and the particular blend varies from company to company.
     
  7. Bozho

    Bozho Member

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    With the BRKT compounds black is coarser than green and gives more bite to the edge.
     
  8. Drew RedBear

    Drew RedBear Member

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    Okay, thank you gents
     
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  9. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    Just found out there is a Rockler Woodworking store not too far from me. Stopped in and ended up leaving with a King 800/4000 combo stone. Going to give it a try out this weekend!
     
  10. Mudman

    Mudman Member

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    feel the burrrr.

    That was the biggest game changer for me, if you have an even burr full length, then it's time to swap sides. If there are patchy spots with no burr, then it's uneven. That's been my approach at least. I cut my finger just last week putting this theory to the test.
     
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  11. Bozho

    Bozho Member

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    If there is no burr at some place, then the edge bevel is not even and you are sharpening the "shoulder" at that particular place. Happens with most factory sharpened knives.
     
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  12. Kevo

    Kevo Member

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    You guys got that right!

    I like to use the sharpie marker trip the first couple of time through with a knife I haven't sharpened previously.
     
  13. Frigin

    Frigin Member

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    My eyes are tired from reading all 10 pages. Now to start looking around. I’ll have to put up what I’m looking at before I buy
     
  14. Drew RedBear

    Drew RedBear Member

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    A little lansky love today 20200403_152905.jpg 20200403_135931.jpg
     
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  15. TerryD

    TerryD Member

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    What's everyone's preferred method for sharpening a Scandi grind like a RB3? I have an Arkansas stone and the 5 stone Lansky set plus a ceramic rod and a double sided strop with black and green compound.

    Just a basic technique walk though is what I'm looking for. And I'm not looking for crazy sharpening either, just a good useable edge for general outdoors use.

    Thanks!
     
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  16. Bozho

    Bozho Member

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    I use a big Norton India stone and place the blade on it in such a way that the whole width of the scandi grind makes contact with the stone, then sharpen in like any other knife.

    Perhaps you can train on a cheap Mora knife before going on the RB3
     
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  17. Strigidae

    Strigidae Moderator Staff Member

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    Im pretty sure the RB3 has a secondary bevel?
     
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  18. Bozho

    Bozho Member

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    To fully benefit from the scandi grind it needs to have no secondary bevel. I am not sure if the steel would allow for a zero scandi edge, as softer steel can chip or roll on hardwood when the grind is too thin.
     
  19. Strigidae

    Strigidae Moderator Staff Member

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    Beats me. I ended up convexing mine.
     
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  20. Bozho

    Bozho Member

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    Convexing the very end of the scandi bevel, the cutting edge, happens often when you do freehand sharpening, as the human hand can not keep a constant angle with each stroke.

    All my scandis eventually get convexed due to sharpening freehand on a stone. I like the result as the edge gets more stability on hard materials and cuts a lot better than a scandi with a secondary bevel.
     
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