Snow Boots Recommendations?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by RocketmanDane, Dec 16, 2019.

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  1. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    Looks like there is going to be a WHOLE LOT more snow in my future. So i am looking for recommendations for a good pair or 2 of snow Boots/ Shoes?

    #1 Looking for a Calf high pair of slip on boots.
    #2 Looking for a Pair of Very waterproof/ Snow proof shoes/ Ankle high shoes?

    These boots/ Shoes might see a few months of snow use each year.

    I currently have a pair of Keen WP Targhee 2(I believe) Ankle high that is ok but not really the most WP..

    Recommendations?

    Thanks!
     
  2. JV3

    JV3 Member

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    i really like my salomon boots. this i wear for 20's and above or when the snow isn't much more than a few inches: Salomon X Ultra Mid Winter CS WP

    https://www.backcountry.com/salomon...MIirfl09u75gIVoINaBR3KGQ5lEAQYByABEgLw6vD_BwE

    for below 20's or deeper snow i use this pair (and it's also warmer than above):
    Salomon Toundra Pro CS WP Winter Hiking Boots

    https://www.rei.com/product/169090/salomon-toundra-pro-cs-wp-winter-hiking-boots-mens?CAWELAID=120217890008282056&CAGPSPN=pla&CAAGID=15997809160&CATCI=aud-363396065244:pla-411018004266&cm_mmc=PLA_Google|404_136270|1690900006|none|_kenshoo_clickid_|aud-363396065244:pla-411018004266&lsft=cm_mmc:pLA_Google_LIA|404_136270|1690900006|none|_kenshoo_clickid_&kclid=_kenshoo_clickid_&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIirfl09u75gIVoINaBR3KGQ5lEAQYAyABEgL6IfD_BwE

    if you have kahtoola microspikes go a size up on the 2nd boot above. it's just as warm as my sorel caribou boots but farless clunky for when you actually still need to hike especially in non-flat terrain. if i'm just sitting around then i'd go for the sorel caribou since it's easier to put it on and off frequently.

    https://www.sorel.com/mens-caribou-...ribou&dwvar_NM1000_variationColor=238#start=1

    oh, and the salomons are truly waterproof (having waded through streams multiple times). i hate it when boot makers say it's waterproof and the melted snow on it starts to soak it eventually at the end of the night (my merrell phaser peaks specifically have tortured me many a nights with frozen feet).
     
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  3. JV3

    JV3 Member

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    not sure what those outie tongues are all about but the links still work fine.

    also, if you don't have a pair already...invest in kahtoola microspikes...they are worth their weight in gold.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2019
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  4. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    @JV3
    How do those boots run width wise? I have noticed not many snow boots list width.. Having wide feet it’s always a concern for me..

    I was looking at those Sorel boots and the similar Sorel boots.

    I have never really been around serious snow like I will likely experience.. I have previously just gotten away with WP combat Boots and heavy socks but have since given all them away..

    SO I’m clean slating my Snow boot selection in other words..

    I have never seen those micro spikes before and gonna need to give them a look. I have used a similar style but they were almost like tire chains with Suarez chains. Because of the square gripping edges thou I noticed they ate into the boot soles.
     
  5. JV3

    JV3 Member

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    the salomons are on the narrow side (not sure if they sell wide version). i can only use my normal "everyday" wool socks with them (same thickness as what you would normally wear with rubber shoes in the summer) but their temp rating is accurate in my case so i have no need to wear thicker socks for insulation.

    the sorel caribou are very roomy i can wear the thickest wool socks (smartwool expedition socks for reference) and still have room to spare. it's what i'd pick for single digits and below (or i'm sitting around most of the time and barely producing any extra body heat).

    if i had to pick only one though i'd wear the sorels to be safe from frostbite and pack extra bacon to make up for the extra calories i'll burn lugging those heavy boots around :)
     
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  6. McKROB

    McKROB Member

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    Having grown up in a pretty snowy part of the country, and worked a lot outdoors in northern Canada, Greenland, and Scandinavia in the winter, I’ve come with what works for me, mostly by trial and error, and it’s essentially five different styles of boots for different activities/conditions:

    1) around town every day winter boots: my most worn winter town boots are my Muck Muckster II Ankle boots, in the Blundstone style. These are waterproof slip-on neoprene boots, relatively warm, and comfy enough for walking around town. Being neoprene they handle road salt well, and no laces to tie. Downside is they don’t breath and have very little ankle support.

    2) wet snow and moderate cold: for shovelling/snow blowing the driveway, Kamik Bushman boots, these are pull on full length neoprene slip on boots. They are warm and decent to walk in. Downside is they don’t breath and very little ankle support.

    3) cold and dry, lots of snow, minimal to moderate physical activity: Sorel Glacier, these are cold weather boots with a waterproof lower and breathable upper, and removable felt liners. This style of boot is the Canadian standard we all grew up with. Warm, but not the best for walking long distances, and very little ankle support or footbed support and they don’t fit well into snowshoes due to their size. An extra pair or two of liners is a must. I mostly wear mine snowmobiling these days, and around camp. I don’t don’t wear them in warm/wet snow conditions.

    4) snowshoeing boots and moderate short hikes: I’ve had a pair of Sorel Conquest boots for several years and they have held up much better than I ever expected, I use them for snowshoeing and day hikes around town and winter SAR. They have very little insulation so they are not good for standing around in cold weather, but are pretty decent for walking with decent ankle support and are waterproof.

    5) snowshoeing / winter hiking / winter work: I spend a lot of time on snowshoes at work, I wear the same leather hikers I use in the summer, paired with a pair of OR Pro gaiters. Right now it’s Zamberlan Tofanes , when I’m working I bring two pairs and alternate days. These are the best for long hikes and snowshoeing, offering the best ankle support. If properly treated they stay dry all day. Downside is minimal insulation so not the best for standing around. I never wear them anywhere where there is the potential for road salt.

    If I had to pick just two pairs of winter boots (assuming I already have my “all season” leather hikers) it would probably be the Mucksters for around town, and the Sorel Glaciers for cold weather.

    The Kahtoola Microspikes are awesome, I highly recommend them. I’ve tried pretty much all the traction aids out there (Yaktraks, etc) and there is no comparison, the Microspikes go everywhere with me in the winter. I’ve worn mine about six winters now and they are still going strong. I only use them with the Sorel Conquest boots and leather hikers.
     
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  7. Rich275

    Rich275 Member

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    https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/shoes-and-boots/best-winter-boots
    Really nice review of several brands of winter boots.
    I have the Salomon Toundra, bought at an REI garage sale. Mine are about a size and a half too big, but I only bought them to use standing on the range while teaching. They are by far, the warmest boots I've ever owned and being big on me, I can wear thicker socks if needed and even have room in the toe for those pocket hand/toe warmers.
    They have a large, well rounded toe box and are also slightly wide. If I could buy another pair for $75, I'd just go up a half size.
     
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  8. JMick

    JMick Member

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    I work outside in the winter here in Wyoming, I wear Danner Quarries with wool socks and liners or Steel toe Muck boots, a lot of the guys wear the Arctic level. They are ok for walking in.
    For getting around in the winter I wear uninsulated Lowa Renegades (gortex) with liner and wool socks and Kennetrek knee high goretex gaiters. And then when static I pull on Neos insulated overboots. I snowshoe and use Altai Hok backcountry skis with universal bindings with the Lowas. This system works for me, but I only have -20f' a couple of months and -30s a few weeks a year.
     
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