Ready Packs / Mission Packs

Discussion in 'Search, Rescue and Technical Skills' started by Montanan, Sep 22, 2016.

  1. Jeff Randall

    Jeff Randall ESEE Knives / Randall's Adventure & Training Staff Member

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    We are actually moving down to some 8.3mm and 9mm ropes for the stuff we are doing. Like you said, if you have a good understanding of the forces, vector angles, etc. then there is nothing wrong with moving to lighter weight gear.
     
  2. Reno Lewis

    Reno Lewis Knot-A-Challenge Champion

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    So, I got called out at roughly 0530 hours, mutual aid, got home at 1800. Only had 1.5 hours of sleep by the time of the callout, as I had been bitten by an unidentified spider, and I was staying up to monitor it.

    So, as of now, I've been active for about 34 hours, with only one and a half hours of sleep in that time.

    I learned some valuable lessons today, which I will expand upon once I've caught up on sleep.

    In general though, I will be making up a lighter pack, but keeping my larger pack.
     
  3. McKROB

    McKROB Member

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    I use just my vest for the majority of searches, I keep my pack in the command post or truck until needed, and a duffel in my truck with gear that I might need, including extra clothes.

    My vest is a surveyors cruiser's vest (from Cansel, Deakin, or Neville Crosby), I wear the same thing at work so it's something I feel comfortable with. In this I keep essentials, most are items I use on almost every search, including compass, lighter, signal mirror, helicopter flag, compass, GPS, headlamp, extra batteries, flagging tape, whistle, sharpie, notebook, leatherman, sak, water, safety glasses, latex gloves, etc. These vests have a radio pouch so a chest rig isn't necessary, and they are durable and tried and proven in the woods. There is a decent size pouch in the back for rain gear or lunch.

    https://www.deakin.com/products/Details.aspx?p=644096&c=1337&g=all

    [​IMG]

    The pack has everything else in it, and I change what I carrry in it depending on the individual search, I generally use it only when I know it's going to be a longer search and far from the command post.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2016
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  4. Montanan

    Montanan Member

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    That's a pretty sweet looking vest McKROB. Thanks for the link.
     
  5. McKROB

    McKROB Member

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    We do a lot of police evidence searches where we do tight grid searches, this type of search is usually fairly detailed and relatively speaking doesn't involve big distances, in this case light weight is best and the vest is usually the way to go, a lot of the guys on my team also use team-issued coveralls as we are sometimes crawling around on the ground.

    Hasty searches on roads and trails and are a quick and dirty first pass for missing persons where light weight is nice, vest is also the way to go here.

    The pack usually comes along on lost person searches when covering longer distances, such as lost hikers on on the East Coast Trail, hunters, and berry pickers, I quite often ditch the vest in this situation. We also do a fair bit of shoreline monitoring for jumpers/fisherman where we might have to hike in several km then just set up and observe a section of shoreline with binoculars. In this case the pack is also coming along and the vest is getting ditched.

    Each search is a little different and I think it's important to have the ability to be flexible and change up what you are carrrying depending on the situation.
     
  6. Reno Lewis

    Reno Lewis Knot-A-Challenge Champion

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    We have a great variety when it comes to our tasks, but I'll try to be as concise as possible. *Edit - I failed in making it concise*

    The "quickly respond up a small mountain" thing happens during medical calls. Even though we go quick, it often means we will be up on a hill for a few hours depending on how the call goes.

    I live in a rather small town and we are surrounded by rather rugged wilderness, so when someone goes missing from town (mental illness, elderly, children etc), it quickly becomes wilderness oriented. Same with most other towns on the Island (mutual aid). Of course, we do door to door, but at the same time trail runners/off roads are deployed to trail systems in the area. Never know what you're going to be doing.

    I just got back from a mutual aid search for a missing kayaker last night. And this is a perfect example of where a small kit would shine.

    I decided to carry only my radio harness on our first (and only) task.

    Our task was a shoreline search along the East coast of Vancouver Island. Essentially, our instructions were to go as far as we could. And we did. Even though I had a foot entrapment and tweaked my left groin muscle in the first 2k... That was one painful walk the rest of the way (wish I had my IFAK with Advil...). Feeling better now though.

    We walked roughly 12 linear kilometers (not including wandering, detours etc) of really rough, slippery coastline in freezing conditions. Took about 6 hours.

    We were in close proximity to houses, went through three townships, but I think that gives a false sense of security. Those rocks are slippery and sharp, and the chance of physical injury was high in some areas.

    I learned that my "waterproof" gloves are garbage. Luckily they did me well up until the last hour or so though (when it started raining and freezing).

    As for vests, I know a few trackers who love them, and I've tried them out but just can't get used to em. Also, going through blackberry and salal is horrendous with a vest on. Hell, it's even bad just wearing Gore Tex.

    Anyway, my plan is to keep my Arcteryx Echo set up as it is for deep wilderness stuff, and turn my Conterra Crossbow 2 into a rapid response/day pack/hydration pack. I'd bring both and decide what to use in the field or based on the task.

    I'm going to be purchasing a Camelbak Mil Spec Antidote 3L reservoir for it, and making a really small, purely emergency survival kit to carry, and the rest will be pure utility. Food, water (of course), trauma and basic personal first aid, small folding saw for cutting a walking stick in the field if needed, spare gloves, batteries etc.

    I normally dislike bladders because I don't feel they're as useful as a stainless bottle, but for a day pack, I believe the ability to constantly sip, even while moving, will be far more beneficial for short term tasks. Staying hydrated means better mental function and less physical aches and pains!
     
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  7. Montanan

    Montanan Member

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    I use a small Camelbak pack for exactly what you described. So in my biased opinion I think that's a great idea!

    Pro tip: Keep the water out of the tube (blow it back into the reservoir) when it's cold out. This is the only way I have been able to prevent freeze up.
     
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  8. Reno Lewis

    Reno Lewis Knot-A-Challenge Champion

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    Hey, it just seems logical. Right?

    Thanks for the tip. Luckily, we don't get sub zero temps often here (yesterday was horrendous though), so freezing shouldn't be a concern most of the time.
     
  9. Reno Lewis

    Reno Lewis Knot-A-Challenge Champion

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  10. Reno Lewis

    Reno Lewis Knot-A-Challenge Champion

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  11. SEMO

    SEMO Member

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    That is genius. I have had water freeze in the tube, but never thought to do that.
    Thanks
     
  12. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    no prob man.

    watched your video again...going to get one of those Silky BigBoys soon.
     
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  13. Reno Lewis

    Reno Lewis Knot-A-Challenge Champion

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    They're awesome. I'd be happy to make a video comparing it to any other saw I have, if you'd like.
     

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