Home made forge and cutlery

Discussion in 'DIY (Do It Yourself)' started by NT Tristan, Sep 26, 2017.

  1. NT Tristan

    NT Tristan Member

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    Built up this forge out of an old Weber BBQ, an exhaust manifold and a small leaf flower. Lining is sand mixed with plaster of paris.

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    This is after a triple temper in the oven. Heat treat seemed to go well. This project is still a work in progress.

    Below are a couple from my first batch. Pretty rough but all fun and learning more with each one

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    Kitchen set has been getting some use and developing a nice natural patina

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    This one I made for a friend for her husband's birthday

    Thanks for looking :)
     
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  2. SEMO

    SEMO Member

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    Excellent.
    What steels are you using for blades?
    Is that coal or charcoal for fuel?
    Every one will be a learning process.
     
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  3. NT Tristan

    NT Tristan Member

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    I'm using coal for fuel from a local supplier. Also mostly 1095 steel. The small bushcrafty blade is 1084 in 1/8in thickness. The rest are 1095 in 3/32in. I really like that blade thickness, think it's just right. I've already lost a few blades i had to trash after i over-heated them.
     
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  4. SEMO

    SEMO Member

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    You will find that 1084 is much more forgiving than 1095 with your setup.
    I have found 1095 more likely to crack and twist in the quench.
    If you are only using the forge to reach hardening temps try doing in at night, or in a low light situation.
    Daylight seems almost impossible for me to see when the steel is ready.
    Are you using a magnet to determine hardening temp? That will help to know when the steel is ready.

    The main thing is to keep trying. Every knife is a learning process.
     
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  5. karlkortemeier

    karlkortemeier Member

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    Very nice!
     
  6. NT Tristan

    NT Tristan Member

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    Thanks Karl, and thanks Semo for the hot tips.
    I have tried at night and that was better because i could see the colours as you say. Was getting a feel for the sweet spot. Using a magnet too to test for when they become de-magnetised. The blades i lost i had the forge too hot - too much air and the fuel hadn't burned down enough. took a really short time for them to get white hot (over-hot).
    My supplier of steel is out of most carbon steel at the moment! Don't suppose you know a good supplier in the states who would ship to Australia for a reasonable price?!
     
  7. SEMO

    SEMO Member

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    Probably not reasonably priced.
    I buy steel from New Jersey Steel Baron.
     

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