ESEE firesteel badly decomposing!

Discussion in 'ESEE® Knives and Gear' started by floatch, Mar 25, 2020 at 11:18 AM.

  1. floatch

    floatch Member

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    Hey everyone, I've got one of the old ESEE firesteels, and haven't used it in some time. I grabbed for it today and the rod has badly decomposed, losing probably 50% of its total volume, having turned into a very light grey dust.
    I'm about 90% sure these rods are threaded into the body, so before it rusts totally away, I'd like to remove it from the body and replace it. Does anyone know where I can get a replacement rod? If I can't get a new threaded rod, I may just drill the threaded portion out and epoxy a regular rod in its place so I can continue to use the body.
    Has anyone else had this happen? It's nuts, at least half of my rod has just wasted away. It's weird because none of my many other firesteels are afflicted with this same problem, and they're all stored in the same dry place. It's the same room as a bunch of my guitars, so I know it's not too humid in there or anything.
     
  2. notajerryskid

    notajerryskid Member

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    I do not think they are threaded. If memory serves me right they are epoxied. If you cut it flush to the bottom, then use a drill to remove the rest. I have see someone heat up the steel and remove it but I would not suggest that.
     
  3. shaneadams90

    shaneadams90 ESEE Knives Marketing Director Staff Member

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    I would caution you on a drill....as it will throw sparks....use a heat gun, as I *think*, they are epoxied in. I can't recall the diameter right off hand...I'd like to see some photos of what it looks like as this is the first I've heard of one falling apart like this.
     
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  4. hma153

    hma153 Member

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    First knives breaking, now firesteels corroding. What's next for ESEE? ;)
     
  5. OutdoorsFamilyMan

    OutdoorsFamilyMan Member

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    The stickers loosing their ability to adhere....
     
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  6. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    @floatch
    I seems to remember them being exposed.. Def would advise against flames and all :) But you might find something like a hairdryer and heat the ever living cr@p out of it with the fire steel clamped in a vice and then carefully its heavy gloves twist the tube portion. Just make sure to remove the cap before all of this.
     
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  7. FAL'ER

    FAL'ER Member

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    Those things seem to oxidize, I had the same recently with a Swedish army light my fire. Gray powdery residue all over the place. I just scraped the gray stuff away and started making fire. Yours sounds worse off than mine.
     
  8. Sam Wilson

    Sam Wilson Member

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    When it's time to remove it, the method will depend on which epoxy has been used and it's melting point. I doubt a hair dryer will get you there in a reasonable amount of time, but a heat gun will do it unless it is a very high melting point epoxy.

    You can also let it sit in boiling water for awhile, if that will not damage the other components. I don't know what the handle part looks like, but I use a propane torch to heat the handle up on my bare aluminum units and it comes out in a jiffy.

    You're not going to want to drill it out. I would also preserve any threads in the handle (if there are any), as that gives the epoxy something to grab and increases purchase.

    Sam
     
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  9. floatch

    floatch Member

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    So a big thank you to everyone suggesting drilling would be a bad idea! I hadn't even considered that, excellent point.
    I heated the rod and empty body with a 1200watt heat gun in my basement just now, I got it what I would call "hot as f#$&," and it wouldn't budge with pliers. I guess this is just what it is now, I'm not able to remove this rod from the body.
    Here's some pictures:
     
  10. Sam Wilson

    Sam Wilson Member

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    If you keep heating the rod, it will come undone. Most epoxies have a failure point of 150 to 300 degrees Fahrenheit. It's just a matter of staying on it. Just be careful with the ferro rod, because they are very brittle and snap easily.
     
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  11. FAL'ER

    FAL'ER Member

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    Scrape a flat spot and make fire with it.
     
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  12. JHansenAK47

    JHansenAK47 Member

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    Put it in salt water and let the rod corrode away
     
  13. Bozho

    Bozho Member

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    Does anyone knows what is causing this?

    I have a few swedish LMF firesteels, all of them stored in the same room, but one of them has began to corrode, the other ones are fine.
     
  14. FAL'ER

    FAL'ER Member

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    The one of mine that's the worst was kept in a leather loop on a sheath for a couple years without use. Could be some leather making chemical, dye or finish is doing it. Or just plain oxidation. I don't know, It is a thing though.
     
  15. Jeff Randall

    Jeff Randall ESEE Knives / Randall's Adventure & Training Staff Member

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    Best thing to do is set them after using them. You can use nail polish to do that or a lacquer. If they get moist at all then oxidation will wipe them out.
     
  16. Nonkie

    Nonkie Member

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    I have had the same issue with 2 of my light my fire ferrorods.
    I use Wildo now for years, so far they are much better imo...
    Does Esee use the LMF too?
     
  17. Backwoods Runner

    Backwoods Runner Member

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    I have had that happen to a few firesteels, didn't seem to make a difference on brand but it was all when I was spending alot of time bumming around coastal salt marshes and everything got salt water on it sooner or later. Honestly one of the reasons I have never spent much money on fire steels, just used what ever LMF or fire steel blank I could find until it got so corroded it broke, always had a second back up with me and a few more at home so it was never a big deal.
     
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