Do you even ultralight, bro?

Discussion in 'Adventure, Hiking, Backpacking and Travel' started by chorpie, Aug 24, 2017.

  1. nathan shepherd

    nathan shepherd Member

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    This thread needs some photos.

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  2. Stewart

    Stewart Member

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    I'm not an ultralight guy but I do make a conscious effort to buy and use the lightest gear possible without sacrificing comfort. you can save alot of weight by not carrying excess crap and keeping the big three as light as possible.
    My base weight for hunting minus food, rifle and binocs is 13 pounds. With Kids I just dont get out as much now and my fitness is slipping so by keeping the load light I can go further for longer.
     
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  3. ThreeRidges

    ThreeRidges Member

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    I've learned a lot from the Backpackinglight web sight. I don't go that light but I have lightened up. Hammmocks in summer help, no pad.
     
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  4. Bushman5

    Bushman5 Member

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    problem with me is.......I like gear. New gear, old gear, all gear......

    its impossible for me to go ultralight.......i love my knives......and recently in the last 3 months I have bought (multiple knives , thanks @Reno Lewis ), been given a very very very nice hand made knife (thanks @CWB ), and got a smoking deal on a Scrapyard Chophouse (thanks @Dagwood ), in addition to my Esee collection among-st other knives.....so i like to bring them all.....

    no ultralight for me......:D:D:D
     
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  5. nathan shepherd

    nathan shepherd Member

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    I guess it depends on what both of you were packing out for. If he was on a week long trip and your were on an overnight trip then he might have a point even if your packs were the same weight. If you both out for the same amount of time I guess he didn't. I think some backpackers make a huge point about being lightweight to show off how skilled they have become in their hobby. A bit like how bushcrafter like to rant about not splitting wood with a knife but using an axe. They see it as being a higher level of skill. If your happy with the weight of your pack then stuff him.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2017
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  6. C99c

    C99c Member

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    Today's UL/normal stuff. Gossamer Gear Minimalist and Vic Spartan. I removed the black pad sleeve on the pack, not to make it lighter, but because it was hot as hell against my back during the summer and I ditched the pad the day I got it.

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    Last edited: Sep 3, 2017
  7. ArguableLobster

    ArguableLobster Member

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    Save on weight by only carrying higher ABV whisky.
     
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  8. martin_j001

    martin_j001 Member

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    This is not the first time I've heard such a story. That said, it makes one wonder what all they've got with them...assuming the packs weigh the same, it's possible the "ultralighter" has just invested in lighter stuff, meaning they are actually carrying *more* stuff..??? Or they could just be a douche with the same stuff in a UL pack...

    And yeah, my fat ass could stand to lose a full pack's worth of weight and then some before I'm really going to spend big $ shaving ounces off. That said, being able to carry more stuff with less weight is a good thing when it comes to comfort, etc.

    How's the Minimalist compare to something like the REI Flash packs? I've had the REI Flash 18 and 22 and didn't love either, but have considered snagging a Minimalist in the past--the ability to stuff things on the outside seems like a great feature in a pack like this...
     
  9. C99c

    C99c Member

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    My daughter had a Flash 22 ( I think it was. The one with the flap.) and I had an 18 years ago when they first came out. Not bad packs, but I much prefer Gossamer Gear's stuff.
    I didn't care for the shoulder straps or how they were attached on either. My daughter has a short torso and the 22 was just a horrible fit for her. The GG bags on the other hand, fit all three of us comfortably, even when loaded heavier than they should be.

    The shove it stretch pocket on the Minimalist is really nice. Honeslty, I expected that I would have to cut it off years ago because I didn't believe it would hold up to constantly being stretched to it's limit. It has done it again and again and regularly swallows multiple 32 ounce Nalgenes, my Stanley vacuum mug, snacks, leather gloves, extra layers/rain shells for two or three people, garbage, tools and tons of other stuff that gets jammed in there. It's not uncommon to have close to as much stuff in the stretchy pocket as the actual pack is carrying.

    The newer version of the Minimalist has a small section of daisy chain and side pockets which should add even more to its versatility.

    I can't recommend the Minimalist, and Gossamer Gear in general, enough. I've yet to be disappointed with any of their packs.
     
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  10. martin_j001

    martin_j001 Member

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    Thanks, appreciate the mini review. I'll have to get my hands on one sometime for sure (will most likely have to wait until the munchkin is hiking on her own before it'll be handy for me).
     
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  11. 5col

    5col Moderator Staff Member

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    I am always trying to reduce weight in my pack, but now I'm carrying some load for my kids. Seems like any ounce I eliminate they manage to replace.

    My dad used more or less the same backpacking gear for the last thirty nine years. However, in an effort to squeeze in a few more years of backpacking (he's 74 now), he has gone on a gear replacement binge to try and get the lightest gear he can bring himself to buy. His pack now hovers around 30 pounds, including a 2-liter reservoir of water.
     
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  12. chorpie

    chorpie Member

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    Going on a weekend trip to the Channel Islands (Santa Cruz) using an HPG Ute with Tarapocket, my pack without water sits at about 20 lbs. Will load up with about 7L of water though.
     
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  13. chorpie

    chorpie Member

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    I consider the Flash packs to be "travel packs"... as i'd never normally carry one, but when I went to visit my friend in Colorado, it was nice to bring that so that I had a "backpack" as it takes up no space in carry on luggage.
     
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  14. 5col

    5col Moderator Staff Member

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    That's pretty good! Looks like the Ute and Tarapocket probably make up about 6 of those 20 lbs.
     
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  15. chorpie

    chorpie Member

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    When my brother and I first started backpacking (his freshman year of high school, my 8th grade), we had external frame Jansport packs, giant burrito sleeping bags, a coleman stove that took 1lb. propane canisters, and a 4p car camping tent. Amazing, the sheer size of things then vs. now.

    That was 26 years ago.
     
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  16. chorpie

    chorpie Member

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    Yeah the rest is food mostly. It's heavier as I went for no cook (except for coffee) since there's no extra water on the island.

    My first trip with the Ute, I traded my Kifaru Pointman for it.
     
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  17. 5col

    5col Moderator Staff Member

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    Exactly the same for me, even down to ages. Except my old Jansport was a step up for me. Initially I carried dad's ALICE pack with frame. That thing was awful.

    I carried that Jansport from age 13 to age 23, at which point the frame and shoulder straps had failed enough times in enough places that I upgraded to a Kelty internal frame, which I still have. I cut all the external pockets off the Kelty, shortened the straps, removed the buckles and zipper pulls, etc. Still the empty weight is 4 lbs. A few years ago I lucked out and picked up an internal frame pack from and REI garage sale. It only weighs 2 lbs, so it's my go-to.
     
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  18. RedEyedHog

    RedEyedHog Moderator Staff Member

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    Rueben’s setup is impressive. I saw him make it with a Monster energy drink can as his canteen and a gas station styrofoam coffee cup as his cook setup. Personally I usually go around 33 lbs with food and water. For some reason I always bring way to much food. Worried I’m gonna starve I guess. Usually a steak or something to grill the first night out. If the wife and or kids come.....I don’t even want to admit how much weight I’ve carried before. It’s ridiculous...
     
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  19. C99c

    C99c Member

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    I remember when Reuben posted the thread years ago about using the Monster can with a lid to boil water. I tried it that next weekend and have used it several times since then. If it's one thing I will always somehow forget to take with me it's a container to boil water or cook with. It's nice to be able to grab something at the last gas station before the trail head to serve that purpose.

    When my daughter was young I just wanted us to get out in the woods as much as possible and for them to enjoy it as much as much as I always did and didn't want my wife having to worry about carrying a pack so I always toted everything.

    If I had it to do over I would do it again the same way, but when they started carrying packs (and we stopped bringing so much extra crap) it made my loads so much lighter.

    Last winter we did a 10 mile trail in the Smokies and for some reason we way over packed water and layers and I decided to bring one of my old heavier packs and carry everything myself. It was a great trip but my shoulders, knees and feet were absolutely miserable the last half of it after years of carrying lighter packs with much lighter loads.
    When we got home I gave that pack away and promised myself that I wouldn't make that mistake again.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2017
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  20. STPNWLF

    STPNWLF Member

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    Ultralight's for Sissy's :p Man up :eek:
    IMG_20170923_153937.jpg
     
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