Why this Forum is Important and Boring

Discussion in 'Wilderness and Tactical Healthcare Management' started by DYSPHORIC JOY, Sep 14, 2016.

  1. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    Over the years I have spent a little bit of time in the woods and engaging in other physical activities. I have camped, hiked, and trained with people from all walks of life. I have been a gear nut as far back as I can remember and could talk knives, packs, and firearms until the cows come home. One of the things I have always done is a gear check prior to heading out on the trail, especially if I am organizing the trip. My life has been threatened for demanding that participants dump all of the organized gear out on the floor for inspection. I admit that this is a bit obsessive, but I like to know the resources that I have available.

    What is the typical load-out even with the experienced and what are the deficiencies from my side of things?

    I find that people really do have contingency plans in place. Hatchets, shovels, 4-5 fixed blades, folders, enough 550 to weave a 200ft line to rappel, 2 tarps, garbage bags, multiple fire sources, a hammock, H2O filter, toothbrush, weapon with multiple magazines, and a band-aid (actually true in one case).

    How many times have I been in a situation where one knife failed or I couldn't get a fire started and the situation became life threatening? Very few but maybe more than normal due to stupidity. Contrast that to the number of times someone has sustained a significant injury that required more than a band-aid.
    Short list: multiple fractures including ribs with respiratory compromise, anaphylaxis, rope burns, dehydration, severe gastroenteritis, lacerations, traumatized ring finger with rapid edema before ring could be removed, bald face hornet sting to penis, psychosis due to anemia, corneal abrasions, and the usual sprains and strains.

    Before you comment that most of the injuries listed are self-limiting and the person would have been fine anyway, I will say that I agree. That is not my point. I am merely providing an opinion that you are more likely to have a health issue in the "wild" than some zombie situation where all the extra gear is necessary. If you can hump the extras, I am all for it because it is fun. I do the same thing, but make sure you save enough space and muscle for a decent FAK.

    But I don't care about all this stuff.

    Agree with this as well. I would rather look at carefully posed knife picks with fabricated wear than even think about bones and blood. Any skillset requires training and experience. That is work and who wants to do that?

    My goal with this forum is to stimulate some interest in taking care of your own or locating resources in a worst case scenario, get folks outdoors more to actually test gear, and provide a home for health and fitness activities on the entire forum.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. 91bravo

    91bravo Guest

    Seriously though, MTM and I have dumped our packs and saw that we have stuff that we don't need half the time. But still, when we go to pull stuff out of our packs, we realize, "What if?" Then we put it back in. Sure may never need a trauma bandage in the woods, but you just never know sometimes. We are of the mentality that it's better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it.
     
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  3. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    These were not all my injuries just a few I have encountered in the woods.
     
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  4. The Warrior

    The Warrior Member

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    This is pretty much my mentality.
     
  5. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    I am all for preparation and training but I like to have fun. I used to carry close to 130lbs at times on long hikes for exercise. There is nothing better than having a huge cast iron skillet, steak, taters, and all the gear you can play with 20miles in before you hit the hay. I used to do survival hikes frequently with little gear but time is so valuable now that I want to have toys along the way. I never get tired of testing new gear. FAKs are like dry firing a weapon...you know you need to do it but the fun is in the bang.
     
  6. Wisdom

    Wisdom Member

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    I agree 100% with your post. I'm amazed when I pack with others, how little med gear they carry. Those same guys usually have half of REI in their pack. Mention a tourniquet, and you get look of confusion.
    PS. Could you get the wild edibles going again? Seems like a great way to learn from others.
     
  7. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes. Feel free to start it off.
     
  8. Rook52

    Rook52 Member

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    Ok @DYSPHORIC JOY I think I see your over all message here and it make sense. If I miss interpreted please clarify. Anyway I'm going to take it as an invitation to pick your brain.
    A bit of a back ground on me, I pretty much hunt, fish, and camp for outdoor activities. So I would like to be best prepared for that type of injury. I know you can't predict every scenario but I feel my med kit is lacking.
    I'm a basic first responder at my work so my medical background if you can call it that consists of CPR and a mid level first aid. I have stitched before on a fake wound.
    My med kit is light so please take a look and help me fill in the gaps. It has:
    Rubber gloves
    Chap stick
    Ibprofrin
    Pepto bismol
    ACE bandage
    Gauze
    Emergency Blanket
    Splitter out
    Bug wipes
    Burn cream
    3in1 antibiotic cream
    Hydrocortisone cream
    Iodine wipes
    Antiseptic wipes
    Hemostats pliers
    Band aids
    Sniffing salt
    I still need kwik clot, suture kit.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    I don't want stuff that I don't know how to use aka too advanced but enough stuff to keep me alive/comfortable until I can get help. Treating of cuts possibly deep and dirty, foreign objects in eyes, broken bones, burns, and struck by are things I might encounter. I live in Wisconsin so poisonous bug/reptiles are not a threat. Thanks in advance.
     
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  9. Joelski

    Joelski Member

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    Forget the foley. Supra-Pubic tap & cath! The poor little guy's had enough injury, no need ot rub salt in it!

    Agree with Jimmy; I'd take a pic just to show off how huge it is/was all swollen up! :D
     
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  10. Creaky Bones

    Creaky Bones Member

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    I can't believe you just said "wee wee" lol. My boss is recovering from a mrsa uti. One of my female coworkers said he had "mrsa in his man meat". Now that was funny.
     
  11. Creaky Bones

    Creaky Bones Member

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    100% on the fak. When we hike, it's usually half adults, half preteen kids. At first they all laughed at my fak. Then someone needed ibuprofen or a tick key or a steri-strip. No one laughs anymore. I just hope no one ever needs my sam splint.
     
  12. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    Copy that. Will take a look later today.
     
  13. AddictedToSteel

    AddictedToSteel Member

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    I am not against having stuff that I am not sure how to use in the most effective way. I may not be an expert or even a well informed novice, but maybe someone with me will know how to use it. Sometimes I carry stuff just so it is available just in case. I may not feel like I know how to use an Israeli bandage or a tourniquet to the best advantage, but that would not stop me from having it along in case someone who does know needs it.
     
  14. Rook52

    Rook52 Member

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    Good point!
     
  15. Dave41079

    Dave41079 Member

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    And in a perfect world, you'd never be using your kit on someone else. Chest seals, needles for decompression, and tourniquets don't take up much space and can do a world of good. I thoroughly recommend taking a class with Hugh Coffee if at all possible to get some excellent exposure to wilderness medicine.
     
  16. Rook52

    Rook52 Member

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    That's what I really need to do is get into a class , invest in my mind and then...gear
     
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  17. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    Here is a very basic list based on your ABC Training. I plan to start a thread specifically for this topic detailing medications and current data.

    1. CPR microshield mask

    2. Tourniquet x 2.

    3. Halo Seals or similar. Read field studies

    4. OLAES 4" Modular Bandage or similar. I like the clear cup because of the additional uses and little space demand. Some feel it is worthless.

    5. Cravat x 2. Could spend a day on this.

    6. 18 gauge syringe needle. Multiple uses but good tool to remove fishhooks while minimizing skin trauma

    7. Additional Heavy Bandages and tool like RIP Shears to make your own. Differing opinions on RIP Shear blade longevity with heavy clothing. More later.

    8. Current Gen Clotting pack. Keep current on data.

    9. Airway

    10. Carabiner

    11. Suction and irrigation syringe

    12. Oral rehydration salts

    13. Meds: Will discuss later. Caution stopping diarrhea.

    14. Moleskin

    15. Coban

    16. SAM

    17. Safety pins

    18. #11 Scalpel

    19. Transpore Tape and Duct Tape

    20. Butterfly closures

    21. White Petroleum Jelly

    22. Dental Floss

    23. Quality Wire Saw

    24. Quality splinter forceps. I use these more than anything else. Don’t buy junk.

    25. Will discuss instruments later: hemostats, needle drivers, pick-ups, etc

    26. WIR Notepad/pencil/Quality writing tool that will mark skin

    I try to utilize items that can function in a dual role even though med kits are very specific. For example, I carry tube gauze. The ESEE fire kit tube works extremely well as an application device. I am an advocate for protecting/treating the hands because they are useful.

    FAKs are like your regular activity specific prep and vary for each situation. Minimum should always include a TQ/ trauma bandage along with the training to apply for all Forum members since we are more likely to get a significant laceration. Again, things can go sideways with a TQ so proper training is imperative!

    I used a dead groundhog to show my son how much force we sometimes apply "whittling" and proper leg positioning. Demonstrating loss of knife control and utilizing the groundhog as my inner thigh, an ESEE 3 went through the abdomen into the spine.

    The "take home" is: Train, Train, and Train more. Know your kit. It shouldn't be like your wife's closet when you need your gear.
     
  18. Rook52

    Rook52 Member

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  19. DYSPHORIC JOY

    DYSPHORIC JOY Moderator Staff Member

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    Copy that. I am sure we will expand on FAKs since it is a topic that is never static. Just wanted to get a little info out to you since I didn't get in until very late last night.
     

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