Foraging / Food Collection Tips/ Tricks/ Gear

Discussion in 'Survival and Wilderness Skills' started by RocketmanDane, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    2,916
    Location:
    Here and there...
    Foraging / Food Collection is a topic i have ZERO experience in and there isn't a thread i can find SO lets talk about it!

    Ideas? Tips? Tricks? Warnings? References? Good Books? Pamphlets?
    Berries? Mushrooms? Bark?

    Possible References that i'm looking into.

    What to Eat?

    The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants
    by Samuel Thayer (Author)
    https://www.amazon.com/Foragers-Har...NFV014JWND52H7XC&pd_rd_w=67ub7&pd_rd_wg=qMmjd

    Edible Wild Plants: A North American Field Guide to Over 200 Natural Foods
    by Thomas Elias (Author),‎ Peter Dykeman (Author)
    https://www.amazon.com/Edible-Wild-...WMCT62HQ822YH7V9&pd_rd_w=jzd1G&pd_rd_wg=KI9NC

    Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods From Dirt To Plate (The Wild Food Adventure Series, Book 1)
    by John Kallas (Author)
    https://www.amazon.com/Edible-Wild-...rd_wg=euJSU&psc=1&refRID=14F4JGX2R4MPK65BXAC5

    Backyard Foraging: 65 Familiar Plants You Didn’t Know You Could Eat
    by Ellen Zachos (Author)
    https://www.amazon.com/Backyard-For...rd_wg=euJSU&psc=1&refRID=14F4JGX2R4MPK65BXAC5

    Northeast Foraging: 120 Wild and Flavorful Edibles from Beach Plums to Wineberries (Regional Foraging Series)
    by Leda Meredith (Author)
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1604694173/ref=ox_sc_mini_detail?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

    Midwest Foraging: 115 Wild and Flavorful Edibles from Burdock to Wild Peach (Regional Foraging Series)
    by Lisa M. Rose (Author)
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1604695315/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

    Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants
    by Bradford Angier (Author),‎ David K. Foster (Editor)
    https://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-...&qid=1517101909&sr=1-1&keywords=9780811734479

    Edible Wild Plants for Beginners: The Essential Edible Plants and Recipes to Get Started
    by Althea Press (Author)
    https://www.amazon.com/Edible-Wild-...d_t=gateway&psc=1&refRID=JE82R9SSNPGH5WFDVD3F

    What Not to eat?

    Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln's Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities
    by Amy Stewart (Author),‎ Briony Morrow-Cribbs (Illustrator)
    https://www.amazon.com/Wicked-Plants-Lincolns-Botanical-Atrocities/dp/1565126831

    Possible Gear:

    Dump Pouches

    Maxpedition Roly Poly Pouch
    [​IMG]
    Baskets
    [​IMG]
    Or
    [​IMG]
    Or
    [​IMG]
    Or
    [​IMG]
    Or
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2018
    Datilite, jbs121s, B-line and 3 others like this.
  2. Delkancott

    Delkancott Member

    Messages:
    2,296
    Likes Received:
    3,767
    Location:
    SEMA
  3. chessiedog1

    chessiedog1 Member

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    21
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    western PA
    I have a ton of books, some good some not. I would take a look at your local state parks, local museums and hiking clubs. Here, around Pittsburgh they all put on hands on programs on foraging/ edible plants during the spring and summer. If you take your books with you , it makes understanding the pictures a lot better. You can make a ton of notes in the books which will help you in the future.

    We also have a green / live off of the land group here, they also put on walks for edible plants. Even one library here has a once a month meeting on the subject, they teach you how to prepare it,cook it and you get to taste it. Both make you join the clubs after the first meeting.

    When my son was in Boy Scouts, during the week long camping trips, they always had a foraging walk in the woods. We both had a great time and learned a lot.
     
  4. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    2,916
    Location:
    Here and there...
    I actually spotted this book in i think Costco BUT didn't realize at the time why i would want a book on Poison plants... (DooooooooHHHH)

    I personally own the one below. Honestly i don't remember why i bought this exact one BUT am looking at the Northeast Foraging: 120 Wild and Flavorful Edibles from Beach Plums to Wineberries book. It seems pretty well recommend on Amazon VIA reviews on other books that say buy the NE Foraging one instead.
    Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants by Bradford Angier (Author),‎ David K. Foster (Editor)
    https://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-...&qid=1517101909&sr=1-1&keywords=9780811734479
     
    The Marsh Gorilla likes this.
  5. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    3,947
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Center, Texas
    I have "North American Field Guide to Edible Plants" by Elias & Dykeman, I've been eating plants identified in it for 25 years and haven't died. I'd say it's a good guide. ;)
     
  6. The Marsh Gorilla

    The Marsh Gorilla Member

    Messages:
    1,203
    Likes Received:
    2,936
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Villa Gorilla
    RocketmanDane, anrkst6973 and Zeek like this.
  7. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    2,916
    Location:
    Here and there...
    Do you mean this one?

    Edible Wild Plants: A North American Field Guide to Over 200 Natural Foods
    by Thomas Elias (Author),‎ Peter Dykeman (Author)
    https://www.amazon.com/Edible-Wild-Plants-American-Natural/dp/1402767153

    Awesome! I will def add these to the list!
     
    The Marsh Gorilla likes this.
  8. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    3,947
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Center, Texas
    Mine has a slightly different cover but I think it's the same. My neighbors just smile and wave now when they see me out perusing the road ditch with the roly-poly on.
     
  9. AddictedToSteel

    AddictedToSteel Member

    Messages:
    894
    Likes Received:
    841
    Location:
    Michigan
    Due to the oil, salt, and other stuff that comes off vehicles, I have been advised not to eat stuff from too near the roads. I am assuming that would include dead animals and anti-freeze. Since you seem to not follow this course, what are your thoughts about this?
     
  10. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    3,947
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Center, Texas
    1: I read a study some years ago that found most of the "heavy bad" residue was within 6-8 ft of the actual edge of the pavement. Dead animals are ultimately, a natural thing. No different that predator kills or drowned animals found in the river.
    2: I use white vinegar in water as a soak before any further processing. This will release the majority of surface stuff on the plants. Much the same way that you can use it to clean a coffee pot or washing machine. There is som kind of wash stuff you can buy at the store that supposedly will do the same thing, but I just use grandma's vinegar trick.

    3: These plants are not eaten raw. They get chopped up and added to stir frys, soups, or stews that are thoroughly cooked.
    4: I am fortunate to live in a very low traffic area. I would avoid major highways, city streets, or city parks where you might have concerns of pesticide or herbicide use.
     
    Caleb O, STPNWLF, Zeek and 4 others like this.
  11. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    2,916
    Location:
    Here and there...
    On the subject of cleaning with vinegar I am reminded of a professor I had a few years ago. She was a chemistry / food sciences Prof and was studying the use of wine as a cleaning agent for fruits and vegetables. According to her she said that washing vegetables was obviously important and yes washing with wine did help clean more then just water. BUT she said one of the biggest factors was how you washed the produce. She recommended a substance whether it be a vegetable soap, wine or vinegar etc PLUS the use of a physical cleaning method such as shaking a sealed bowl or salad spinner or they even have “produce cleaning” devices that are pretty much a salad spinner.
    My take from that as applied to forage edibles is that a physical cleaning would be a important step in removing any potential contamination or other unwanted substances. If in the wild cleaning in a shaken water bottle , shaken camping type pot or even shaken watertight bag might be a great idea.

    @anrkst6973 have you by chance tried drying any of your foraged plants?
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2018
    The Marsh Gorilla likes this.
  12. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    3,947
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Center, Texas
    @RocketmanDane I used to dry a lot of plants, dandelion, pigweed, dock, sheep sorrel. It take a large amount of greengage to make a small jar of crushed herbage. :) In this geographic area I can get "most" of the plants I want nearly year round. One of the benefits of the mild climate here.
     
    STPNWLF and The Marsh Gorilla like this.
  13. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    2,916
    Location:
    Here and there...
    The type of salad washers I was referring to I posted below.
    On a side to that while I was digging up a photo I found a very short article on using a washing machine to cleaning dirty/ farm produce. I’ll past the link below. I thought it was funny :)

    https://tinyfarmblog.com/spin-cycle/

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2018
    The Marsh Gorilla likes this.
  14. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    2,916
    Location:
    Here and there...
    Currently i am compiling a list of common names and associated Scientific names. I realize there may be duplicates and plants listed as possibly more then 1 thing BUT here is my running list.. I will update it as i par it down. Plan is as i par the list down i will then sort it by what is ACTUALLY available in North America.

    Taking the list down for more work on it..
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2018
    The Marsh Gorilla and anrkst6973 like this.
  15. The Marsh Gorilla

    The Marsh Gorilla Member

    Messages:
    1,203
    Likes Received:
    2,936
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Villa Gorilla
  16. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    2,916
    Location:
    Here and there...
    Still working on the list above...
    Does anyone happen to know of any good Foraging field guides.. Think laminated cards on a ring you can flip through?

    Also been looking at options for a good foraging knife. Currently looking at a Opinel #8 grafting knife(same as there mushroom knife minus the small brush as far as I can tell. Or the Opinel #8 Gardening knife.
     
    The Marsh Gorilla likes this.
  17. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    3,947
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Center, Texas
    I got a set of cards many years ago from Campmor, being playing card size the number of plants listed was smaller, 52 cards total, plus the photos were rather small. I think you would do better to get one of the books. Used often it lets you work at memorizing what plants are most common in your area. While I have often used whatever knife was in my pocket I found that a pair of EMT shears was the best plant snippers ever. Cut greengage and tape to fix stuff with equal aplomb. Just a thought.
     
  18. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    2,916
    Location:
    Here and there...
    Well i am going to reconfigure the list. I Actually picked up the Southeast and Northeast foraging books that was recommended :) What i want to avoid is having to lug around a book in the field. Trying to par down 200 listed plants with not the best pictures to a handful with better pictures. Hence wanting to make cards.

    I have a few extra pairs of EMT shears ill dig out.

    Currently working on sewing a good foraging pouch will post PICS when i get a little farther along :)
     
    anrkst6973 and The Marsh Gorilla like this.
  19. anrkst6973

    anrkst6973 Member

    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    3,947
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Center, Texas
    image.jpeg

    Good on ya RMD! I tried to get an accurate weight, it shows at 1.7 lbs for these items. I had the thought that you could use google images to find pics of what you want, size and print them out on a color printer, adding what text you need for identification at the bottom. Then have those laminated at a copy shop. Presto, you get the "book" knowledge without all the heavy covers and fly leaf pages, in a weather resistant plastic format. :)

    Edit: This book was laminated about....22 years ago by a good freind at an elementary school. It's been laid on wet ground, dunked in the river a few times,and might last another generation or 2.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2018
  20. BlueDogScout

    BlueDogScout Member

    Messages:
    2,302
    Likes Received:
    2,387
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Southern Illinois
    Thayers book is really good. I like it. I also went to a local wildlife refuge and bought books specific to southern Illinois for trees, fruit, mushrooms and poison. They also had great pamphlets for the immediate area that they produced. I like the dump pouches also, unless you are picking mushrooms then you want a mess bag. Mushroooms release spores to reproduce. If you pick them and put them in a solid bag like the dump pouch then they will start to die out in the area. If you put them in a mesh bag then the spores will fall out as you walk create more delicious fungi in the area. I have a cotton snipers veil that I use as a net, mushroom bag, and gear hammock under my tarp.
     

Share This Page