Cameras AKA the way we help Remember and share what we have Seen

Discussion in 'Knives, Gear, Guns And Other Tools' started by RocketmanDane, Sep 21, 2016.

  1. shaneadams90

    shaneadams90 ESEE Knives Marketing Director Staff Member

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    To add one thing to what the Aussie says.....

    When I started with a 35mm full manual camera....we had to know the fundamentals of photography....now...we also have to spend about the same amount of time learning to USE and OPERATE the camera itself....

    Don't rule out a nice Point and Shoot that you understand how to operate. I've seen Jeff and Reuben take some phenomenal photos with a pocket camera. Driving home....it's the Indian...not the arrow (but a straight arrow never hurt)


    A few things I would suggest you look up and study on to get you started...(YouTube would be great here)

    Rule of Thirds

    Golden Mean

    F Stop

    Apeature

    ISO

    Shutter Speed
     
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  2. JollyRoger523

    JollyRoger523 Member

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    I still prefer my DSLR (which is going on 12 years old now) but have not checked into newer point and shoot models. I'd love something smaller and easier to transport. The limiting factor for me had always been picture quality and camera control. I know newer technology has probably solved these issues. But back when I bought my DLSR the vast majority of point and shoot cameras had smaller and lower quality sensors. They also had minimal, if any, control over appature or shutter speed.

    Whatever you use, the most important thing to remember is to understand how to achieve what you want. Example: do you want a fast shutter speed to freeze your kid in motion while he's batting at t-ball? Do you want a slow shutter speed to give you a nice flowing waterfall (and do you have something to hold the camera steady during the long exposure)? Do you want a small aperture for that nice big depth of field for a landscape, or do you want a large aperture to isolate that flower and blur out the background?

    Also you have to understand the limits of your equipment. Do you need long telephoto, ultra-wide angles, macro capability? Will you need to use any filters (polarizer filters are a necessity for me). Do you need external flash capability? Obviously a DSLR is king in this area, but that comes at a hefty expense and added gear weight. Truth be told, most people don't really need this extra capability. I know there are converters to add filters and lens adapters to various point and shoots.

    Another consideration is image display. Do you want to get into photo editing to have control over the picture details? You can often create a better photo, but it's easy to "overdue" the editing especially if you're new. That's being said, I believe most modern cameras do a very good job of adjusting those types of settings in their scene modes (landscape, portrait, night, etc). Another aspect of this is viewing platform. Is this only going to be displayed on a computer screen, or do you want to print a large picture for your wall. Most cameras look nice on a screen. You'll need a quality sensor and lens to print large pics that look good.

    I've thought about this before, when my DSLR needs replaced I'll buy another. This is only because I'm already invested in the "system". If I were starting new, I would be looking at the compact cameras that still allow you to change lenses and add flashes.

    Edit: whatever you use, understanding photo principles such as composition, rule of thirds, angles of light, etc, etc will improve your photos more than any piece of gear ever will.

    Sorry for any auto correct errors. Typing from phone.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2019
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  3. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    Currently looking at some of the Canon EOS M50 Packages on Blackfriday.
     
  4. Andy the Aussie

    Andy the Aussie Moderator of the Century Staff Member

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    I should add that I also "split the difference" between the Pentax 90WR P&S I have and my Nikon DSLR....I was never entirely happy with the P&S camera and the images were to inconsistent for me (it would take a great pic then I was not able to do the same again no matter how I tried) and a rubbish pic. But I did always have it with me ! When we were heading off to NZ a couple of year ago and getting dropped in by helicopter weight was all consuming and I realized well out from the trip my DSLR and a lens or two were just going to be too large. I ended up buying a Nikon1 V1 (https://www.nikon.com.au/en_AU/product/discontinued/mirrorless-cameras/nikon-1-v1 ) and could not be happier. It is NOT my DSLR but it is much more than most P&S cameras. I have a couple of lens' for it, the external flash unit, a remote control (a most under rated accessory that is not just for taking "artistic nudes" of yourself on a fallen tree) and a very lightweight tripod. with this small package (about the total weight of one lens from my DSLR) I can tailor it to many of my needs in the wild.
     
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  5. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    Ended up getting a steal on the Canon EOS M50.
    Also got the lens adapter to use the the DSLR lenses .

    @shaneadams90 if you have a second please tell me what you think?

    https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/m50-ef-m-15-45mm-f35-63-is-stm-lens-kit-black

    https://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/mount-adapter-ef-eos-m

    The DSLR lens that I’m getting
    Canon EF 70-200mm with 1.2m to Infinity and 3m to Infinity
    And
    Canon EFS 18-25mm Macro down to 0.25m/ 0.8ft

    Canon EOS M50
    • EOS M50 (Black)
    • EF-M 15–45mm f/3.5–6.3 IS STM Lens
    • RODE VideoMic GO Microphone
    • Sandisk 32GB SD Card
    • Battery Pack LP-E12
    • Battery Charger LC-E12
    • Neck Strap EM-200DB
    • Camera Cover R-F-4
    Canon EOS M50 Features:
    • Improved Dual Pixel CMOS AF and Eye Detection AF.
    • 24.1 Megapixel (APS-C) CMOS Sensor with ISO 100–25600 (H: 51200).
    • 4K UHD* 24p and HD 120p** for Slow Motion.
    • Built-in OLED EVF*** with Touch and Drag AF.
    • NOTES:
    • * Shooting at 23.98p is possible. Shooting takes place by cropping pixels from the center of the sensor. Contrast detection AF is used.
    • ** AF is fixed. Playback is 1/4 slow motion playback (29.97p).
    • *** The EOS M50 camera's EVF does not support a display change to the vertical layout.
    Canon EOS M50 Specifications:
    • Basic Specs:
      • SKU: 2680C067
      • Camera: Canon EOS M50 (black)
    • Type: Digital single-lens non-reflex AF/AE camera
    • Recording Media: SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards (* UHS-Icompatible)
    • Image Format: Approx. 22.3 x 14.9mm (APS-C)
    • Compatible Lenses:
      • EF-M lens (and EF/EF-S lenses when using Mount Adapter EF-EOS M)
      • Equivalent to approximately 1.6x the focal length indicated on a mounted lens
      • Lens Mount: Canon EF-M mount
    • Image Sensor:
      • Type: Canon CMOS Sensor
      • Pixels: Effective pixels: Approx. 24.1 Megapixels
      • Total pixels: Approx. 25.8 Megapixels (* Pixel count may decrease due to image processing.)
      • Pixel Unit: Square pixel approx. 3.72 µm
      • Aspect Ratio: 3:2
      • Dust Removal Feature: Auto/Manual
    • Recording System:
      • Recording Format: EXIF 2.31 (DCF2.0)
      • Image: JPEG/RAW (CR3 a Canon 14-bit RAW format)
    • Kit Lens: 3.00x zoom 15-45mm (24-72 mm eq.)
    • Viewfinder: EVF / LCD
    • Native ISO: 100 - 25,600
    • Extended ISO: 100 - 51,200
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2019
  6. JollyRoger523

    JollyRoger523 Member

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    Looks like you made a good choice. I read good things about Canon's mirrorless cameras when they first came out. My own system is Canon (40D and various lenses). I really haven't been keeping up with anything new for several years now.

    I know Canon has updated some of their signature lenses. The first gen. lenses are still a great buy, since the newer lenses dropped the price on them. One example is the 17-40L. I'm sure there are more, I just haven't kept up with new info lately.
     
  7. shaneadams90

    shaneadams90 ESEE Knives Marketing Director Staff Member

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    Looks good....I'd buy at least one other battery...maybe 2 if you plan to do ANY video.


    other than that....time to get to know the camera! Enjoy
     
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  8. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    Thanks @shaneadams90 @JollyRoger523 @Andy the Aussie @Ballenxj (And anyone else I missed :) )
    I’ve been trying the new camera out getting a few shots when I can.

    Ive had the locals and kiddos out of school for break working against me.

    The manual is about 3/4 a inch thick and I’ve been going through it page by page so far.

    @shaneadams90 I agree on the extra battery’s. Hunting for some good deals on them at the moment but with a 2 hr charge time after about 250 shots (that’s what the book says...) at least 1 extra battery is a must.

    I’ve been posting some test shots over on Instagram but nothing fancy. And have received some good feedback so far.
     
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  9. shaneadams90

    shaneadams90 ESEE Knives Marketing Director Staff Member

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    Cold temps and video will EAT thru battery life....

    an inexpensive Tripod should be on the list as well...you might hit up FaceBook Market place for that as well....
     
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  10. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    I’ve been hunting FB for them since I started looking. I have a tripod I’ve used with a bracket to attach to my phone. Then I got a phone with no headphone jack and the Bluetooth clicker ate the battery... But that means I can now use it with the camera.
    It’s looking like people are dropping a bunch of their old cameras and lens on FB after black Friday so crossing my fingers for a good deal on lenses.
     
  11. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    @shaneadams90 @Andy the Aussie @JollyRoger523
    Do you have a recommendation for taking low light photos? @shaneadams90 I followed you on IG so you can see a example of what im having a problem with. Im getting to much light in a dark photo.. Im not sure if a Hood or a filter would help with this..
    Anyone else i have the same the same name on IG if you want to see the photos im taking.
     
  12. shaneadams90

    shaneadams90 ESEE Knives Marketing Director Staff Member

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    If you are having issues with low light photos.....my suggestion is to take at least 200 as quick as possible....AFTER you've studied your camera a bit...

    it often has to do where you meter in your frame....on my camera, set in Auto mode, I can control where I meter the light and focus....
     
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  13. Andy the Aussie

    Andy the Aussie Moderator of the Century Staff Member

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    .... yes this. Also a tripod will assist greatly if you are slowing your shutter speed down, experiment with higher ISOs as well, the higher you go the more gain you may see but more modern cameras are allowing you to go higher and higher with little discernible grain (to the average eye). And as Shane says, consider what it is you want appearing in your low light pic and make sure you are metering off that (or close to it) so that you are not adjusting for a much darker object or space.
     
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  14. RocketmanDane

    RocketmanDane Member

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    Gotcha, I have been trying different modes on different objects. For example I had to sit in my car for 15 minutes today and was trying different modes and options on photos of my steering wheel( I know so exciting..)

    Im really trying to focus on near night photos that I then don’t edit other then cropping.

    I will say that I LOVE the fact that going from my phone to a camera waves on the beach no longer look super weird!
     
  15. JollyRoger523

    JollyRoger523 Member

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    I'm not on Instagram, but based on your post here's a few brief suggestions.

    First you said you're getting too much light in your photos. If they are too bright overall, it could be your light meter over exposing (light meters "look for" 18% gray neutral tones). If this is the case then you can use exposure compensation or use manual mode to over come the problem. A little reading on light meters and a little practice should give you a good understanding of how this works.

    If some areas of your photo are fine, but others are too light: cameras have much less dynamic range than our eyes. Any stray brighter light sneaking into the photo will be washed out. Frame the photo carefully to avoid this stray light.

    General tips:

    I've found with dark/night photos it's even more important to determine what the main subject is. Obviously subject needs to stand out but by their nature if most of the photo isn't dark it doesn't look right to our brain (example a city at night. The lights are typically the subject and the buildings and landscape are darker).

    A tripod can be a great tool to keep your camera steady for long exposures. Depending on where you are, you could also rest your camera on something as a makeshift tripod/monopod.

    Larger apertures will let in more light and shorten your exposure time. Just make sure your subject is within your desired depth of field (how much of your photo is in focus)

    You can increase your ISO to make the sensor more sensitive to light. This comes at the expense of increased noise/gain in your photo. But modern cameras are amazing at managing the noise.

    Edit: a flash also helps, but is a whole other learning curve.
     

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